Ask Dr. Zammitti: How do my gums affect my heart?

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Believe it or not, an estimated 80 percent of American adults currently have some form of gum disease. Periodontal diseases range from simple gum inflammation to serious disease that result in major damage to the soft tissue and bone that support the teeth. In gingivitis, the milder form of gum disease, infection leads to chronic inflammation—gums are swollen, red, and sometimes bleeding. In the worst of cases, teeth are lost.

We know that gum disease is a threat to your oral health. But new research is also pointing to health effects of periodontal diseases that go well beyond your mouth. Recently, our staff at Zammitti Orthodontics read an article that reported a study that indicated an association between gum disease and heart disease.

In a recent report published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, researchers found that the more severe the gum disease, the thicker and harder the walls of your arteries. We encourage you to check out the article for tips on how to improve your overall oral health. If you have any questions, please give us a call and we’ll answer any concerns you may have!